Retirement Pondering Point: Six thoughts on reading obituaries

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  1. I read them only to the point where you’re inspired to do something special or different with my day.
  2. I try to find at least one thing the obituary’s subject did that might reassure you? [ex: feel good that you accomplished something similar]
  3. If they do weigh me down on a given day, I just move on. There’s no reason to force it.
  4. “Obits have next to nothing to do with death and, in fact, absolutely everything to do with the life.” New York Times obituary writer Margalit Fox.
  5. “…a good obit illuminates not just one particular individual’s story but also the broader idea of all that is possible in life.”  STEPHANIE ZACHAREK May 4, 2017. http://time.com/4766634/the-art-of-obit-a-life-in-800-words/
  6. Quote from Austin Kleon about reading obituaries: “Reading them is a way for me to think about death while also keeping it at arm’s length.”  Austin Kleon Show Your Work

 

Retirement Pondering Point: The Gift [a repost]

Retire-Renewers, this is a three-minute wake-up call I’ve bookmarked for a weekly ‘revisit’.

I would love to hear how this TED talk might change an hour, a day, or a year of your life.

Because Stacey Kramer delivered this in 2010, you may be among the 3.7 million people who have already seen it.

Today was the first time I’d seen it. Much better late than never…

Quote from video: “So the next time you’re faced with something that’s unexpected, unwanted, and uncertain, consider…that it just may be…a gift.”

 

10 questions for retirees…inquiring minds want to know.

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Questions I would ask fellow retirees…

  1. Tell me about a good day of retirement. Be as specific as you like.
  2. Tell me something surprising about retirement.
  3. What did you envision about retirement that hasn’t materialized?
  4. What is your most memorable day of retirement so far?
  5. What would you add to your typical retirement day? Be as imaginative as you would like.
  6. “One year from now, I hope that…”
  7. Do all the days blend together? In other words, are weekends any different from weekdays?
  8. Have you volunteered? No guilt here. Just wondering. What would be your first choice of a destination for volunteering?
  9. One piece of advice you would share with retirees–especially in their first year–would be…
  10. How is your retirement different from your parents’?

Retirement Pondering Point: The Gift

Retire-Renewers, even if you’ve already seen it, this is a three-minute wake-up call I’ve bookmarked for a weekly ‘revisit’.

I would love to hear how this might change an hour, a day, or a year of your life.

This TED talk is from 2010 and has been viewed by 3.7 million people.
And today was the first time I’ve seen it.
I went eight years without this ‘gift’ and, because of my jobs and pastimes, I spend a fair amount of time online.

A prime illustration of how wide and deep the Internet has become.

 

Stepping Stone 6: It was difficult to work for myself.

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Oh, sure, there were times I was a very reasonable employer. 

A trip to California? Why not?

Start a new writing project? Sure. It’ll pay off in the future. [It hasn’t yet.]

I got motivated to start new projects and waltz into learning [or trying to learn] new skills and strategies.

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But things stalled when the idea of marketing and any whiff of a profit motive entered into the equation.

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At some point, I put myself on suspension. [Or, in Animal House-speak, ‘double-secret probation’.] [go to the 1:10 mark in the video]

I’ve climbed out of my ‘double-secret’ exile, but still, I’m still in production rather than profit mode. So be it.



Note: I retired for twelve months and learned plenty. I’ll be posting my impressions and lessons–I’ll call them ‘stepping stones‘–as a friend, not an advisor, and certainly not as an expert. Quite the opposite, in fact.

Stepping Stone 3: From self-doubt springs comparisonitis.

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Or is it the other way around?

In reality, they probably work hand in hand.

When everyone on earth was writing more posts, creating more courses, selling more products [no matter that I didn’t have anything to sell nor was I even thinking ‘sales’], it was easy to get drawn into that trap.

And while wrestling with the feeling that I should be doing ‘more’, it would have been nice to have these reminders to gain perspective. [Thank you, Amy Johnson from tinybuddha.com]

Stepping Stone 2: Self-doubt creeps in.

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It was a weird thing, but early on in my year, it seemed like there was always an internal tug-of war–Should I do this? Can I do that?

Things in the past as simple as writing a short blog post…”Is the wording exactly right?” “Is there really any value in these words…for anybody?” “Maybe it needs an extra day to cool off.”

Did this uncertainty come from the shift to a new chapter in life?