Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 11: Move past imperfection.

Buddy snow nose reduced

This post is especially relevant to us as beginners in our creative pursuits.

I like this medium.com post by Thomas Oppong.

Title: Make Life Easier on Yourself by Accepting “Good Enough.” Don’t Pursue Perfection, Pursue Progress

Highlights:

— “In other words, instead of pushing yourself to an impossible “perfect,” and therefore getting nowhere, accept “good.”

— “Perfection is a pursuit of the worst in ourselves, the part that tells us that nothing we do will ever be good enough…”

— “The real world doesn’t reward perfectionists.
It rewards people who get things done.”

Stick with this post for the other valuable quotes from smart people like Brené Brown and Seth Godin.

 

View story at Medium.com

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 10: Laugh at yourself along the way.

Quote of the day:

“After a few more minutes of daydreaming about how fabulous I could become, I look down at the heading on my paper: Janey’s Reinvention Plan. It appears lonely at the top of the page. I should probably add some bullets beneath, but I’ve never been much of a list maker.”
― J.C. Patrick, The Reinvention of Janey

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities to stretch your thinking.

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 8: Find Your Creative Touchstones

word cloud including words touchstone dependable reliableYesterday, I shared a quote from Albert Einstein about the power of irrational thinking.

In my search for a resource to support that quote, I ran across How to Become More Creative and Free Your Mind by Chad Grills.

Sure, I’ve heard and tried some of these techniques and strategies, but Grills does such a nice job of reframing these ideas, and adding new notions, that I immediately shared it with two groups and emailed it to three different accounts.

Along with books from Austin Kleon and Steven Pressfield, I would have to classify this post as a ‘creative touchstone’, a go-to resource I can return to for inspiration.

What are your creative touchstones? And if you don’t have any, launch a full-scale hunt right now! [Or at least after coffee and decadent treat.]

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities to stretch your thinking.

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 7: Give yourself permission to stray.

stylized photo of Albert Einstein

A favorite quote from Albert Einstein:

“I never made one of my discoveries through the process of rational thinking.”

 

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities to stretch your thinking.

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 6: Sometimes, a partner helps.

Black dog looking up at kitchen preparations on counter
When I’m in the kitchen needing to collaborate…okay, bad example.

Finding a fellow painter, photographer, cook, scrapbooker, or writer may be just what you need to launch your creative reinvention.

Educator John Spencer shares his views on this topic here: Ten Things Pixar Can Teach Us About Creativity 

My favorite points:

  • Creativity isn’t a solitary endeavor.
  • Play matters. [Those creativity partners should encourage fun and wild experimentation.]
  • People are more important than ideas. He quotes from the book Creativity, Inc: “Ideas come from people. Therefore, people are more important than ideas…”

Do you have a creativity buddy? How do you contribute to each other’s projects and progress? Let me know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities to stretch your thinking.

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 5: Structure can help.

diary-614149_1280

If you want to build more personal innovation into your days, give this article How Following a Schedule Improved My Creativity by Srinivas Rao a look.

Three points that resonated with me:

  • You can rely on consistent effort, but you can’t rely on inspiration.
  • I was able to put less pressure on myself… I can practice and experiment without worrying about someone judging my work.
  • It was easier to find motivation.

I realize that structure and scheduling may not appeal to all retirees, but this is a time to experiment with what works for you. Find the sweet spot–the happy medium–between moderate expectations and enjoying the process.

Do you have any tips or tricks that spur your creativity? Share them in the comments below.

Thanks for reading.