Photo-a-day 8: Savor your loved ones…

family photo

Srinivas Rao writes a moving piece entitled On the Time We Have Left With The People Who Matter Most To Us

Highlights:

  • “The ultimate measure of a meaningful life is time well spent on things and with the people who matter most to us.”
  • “We need to hear each other’s voices to touch each other’s hearts truly. And you can’t do that with tweets, status updates and text messages.”
  • “…we text more often than we call, we and we message each other more often than we see each other face to face. We choose short, shallow interactions over deep and meaningful conversations.”

Fellow retirees: This isn’t meant to slay you with guilt. Reading this five-minute piece can issue a minor wake-up call to all of us.

If we have the time, let’s maximize it
with the ones we love and appreciate.

Photo-a-Day 7: End Your Day With Laughter

boy laughing with book on his knee
Especially if it’s been ‘one of those days’.

The other night in bed, I read a news clipping [yes, on real newsprint!] about decluttering.

Good info and a relevant story.

But I foolishly scanned the flip side–a depressing rundown of Russia’s increasing influence in American politics.

When I finished, I turned out the light and settled in under the covers.

My eyes closed…and opened.

I was churning, unsettled.

I knew what I had to do.

Flick on the light and read from Jim Gaffigan’s book, Food: A Love Story.

Excerpt:

“Eating fries without salt feels like a sacrifice. What am I, a pioneer? When I have to eat unsalted fries, I often feel like I should be a contestant on Survivor, or something.”

Okay, now I was ready to sleep.

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU ALL!

Photo-a-day 6: It ain’t ‘House Beautiful’ but…

In our retirement years, do we really need the unending crawl of miscellaneous minutiae? [In any years, actually.]

Slap a piece of inexpertly shaped cardboard again the TV.
Prop it up with a book or two.
And you have my makeshift [i.e. desperate] attempt to stifle that annoying march of repeated sports scores across the bottom of the screen. [Just a matter of time before ESPN starts posting results of the drone-racing they’ve started televising. **]

**Honest, I only know this from the on-screen guide.


Photo-a-day 5: Merge new memories with old ones.

This is the new memory…pretty sure it’s a lasting one.

So, driving to home town, I opt to dodge the traffic on the main highway and take the ‘old road’, the one my dad drove when we were kids.

My first stop was Rocca’s Market, a place I’d never been. Google told me this would fill my arms with Sunday dinner from the grill. [Google will tell you darn near everything, won’t it? It’s up to us to sift through it all.]

Anyway, I enjoyed driving down old Monterey Highway and revisiting memories of junior high basketball games, high school friends, and favorite track coaching moments.

And, talk about revisiting old memories…

I caught this sunset shot before exiting toward my home town. Follow that sun and you’ll end up in the Pacific Ocean, by way of acres of agricultural land.

A photo a day…the journey starts.

Buddy and Kindle speech bubble

I’m sitting here on Christmas Day and, as a retiree–every day I’m not working at my school,  I enter my ‘retiree’ state of mind–I’ve decided to continue my ‘try something new’ exploits.

And so, my latest foray is ‘a photo a day’. A photo shares lots of information, is open to translation, and serves as a simple springboard for retirees’ topics.

This is my latest obstacle to productivity…Buddy. who joined us in October and, as you might surmise, is rather adamant about priorities…his priorities.

Retirement Pondering Point: From ‘have to’ to ‘get to’…

burden equals opportunity

Fellow retirees, I wanted to share this excerpt from James Clear’s book, Atomic Habits.

My favorite points from:
How to Be Thankful For Your Life by Changing Just One Word

  • “You transition from seeing these behaviors as burdens and turn them into opportunities.”
  • “We can find evidence for whatever mind-set we choose.”
  • “So often, the things we view as work are actually the reward.”