Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 18: Seize the moment…

girl reaching

So it’s like this.

My friend from NY sent me a quick email telling me a classmate of ours from junior high had passed away…a year ago.

M was always a pretty happy-go-lucky guy and he was the same way as we went facemark-to-facemask in a junior college football game in 1972. And the same way as he served customers at his dad’s fish market and at the restaurant he started in the 80’s.

While I hadn’t seen him for decades, his passing hit me a little harder.

Maybe each succeeding loss of a contemporary does that now…but it was yet another reminder, a tug at my insides, with the familiar message…”What in God’s name are you waiting for? Get out there and make stuff!”

Yeah…it doesn’t have to be good—especially at first. It has to be done, so you have something to build on, a reference point.

And let’s all assume we’re not going to live forever, so it’s time to build some creative momentum.

It doesn’t have to be a leap. Even a step will do. But let’s aim together to be in a different place than we were the day before.

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This post begs for a repeat of the previous link…

How to Never Miss a Day of Creative Work
Highlights:
  1. “Take the minimal viable action of sitting down at your desk…”
  2. “Reduce the scope, but stick to the schedule.”
  3. “It’s better to lower your standards and actually follow through…”

***

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities
to stretch and flex those creative muscles.

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Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 17: Stay on task…

Multiple cogs with icons signifying tasks
Overestimating my ability to handle multiple projects…a major fault
Srini Rao has long been a go-to resource for advice and inspiration. This is one of my favorite posts from unmistakeablecreative.com.
Man intently working at a laptop
Love the wrinkled undershirt look…but hey! He’s sticking with his schedule!
How to Never Miss a Day of Creative Work
Highlights:
  1. “Take the minimal viable action of sitting down at your desk…”
  2. “Reduce the scope, but stick to the schedule.”
  3. “It’s better to lower your standards and actually follow through…”

***

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities
to stretch and flex those creative muscles.

***

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 6: Sometimes, a partner helps.

Black dog looking up at kitchen preparations on counter
When I’m in the kitchen needing to collaborate…okay, bad example.

Finding a fellow painter, photographer, cook, scrapbooker, or writer may be just what you need to launch your creative reinvention.

Educator John Spencer shares his views on this topic here: Ten Things Pixar Can Teach Us About Creativity 

My favorite points:

  • Creativity isn’t a solitary endeavor.
  • Play matters. [Those creativity partners should encourage fun and wild experimentation.]
  • People are more important than ideas. He quotes from the book Creativity, Inc: “Ideas come from people. Therefore, people are more important than ideas…”

Do you have a creativity buddy? How do you contribute to each other’s projects and progress? Let me know in the comments below.

Thanks for reading and stay vigilant for opportunities to stretch your thinking.

 

Retirees’ Creative Reinvention Day 5: Structure can help.

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If you want to build more personal innovation into your days, give this article How Following a Schedule Improved My Creativity by Srinivas Rao a look.

Three points that resonated with me:

  • You can rely on consistent effort, but you can’t rely on inspiration.
  • I was able to put less pressure on myself… I can practice and experiment without worrying about someone judging my work.
  • It was easier to find motivation.

I realize that structure and scheduling may not appeal to all retirees, but this is a time to experiment with what works for you. Find the sweet spot–the happy medium–between moderate expectations and enjoying the process.

Do you have any tips or tricks that spur your creativity? Share them in the comments below.

Thanks for reading.

 

Photo-a-day 8: Savor your loved ones…

family photo

Srinivas Rao writes a moving piece entitled On the Time We Have Left With The People Who Matter Most To Us

Highlights:

  • “The ultimate measure of a meaningful life is time well spent on things and with the people who matter most to us.”
  • “We need to hear each other’s voices to touch each other’s hearts truly. And you can’t do that with tweets, status updates and text messages.”
  • “…we text more often than we call, we and we message each other more often than we see each other face to face. We choose short, shallow interactions over deep and meaningful conversations.”

Fellow retirees: This isn’t meant to slay you with guilt. Reading this five-minute piece can issue a minor wake-up call to all of us.

If we have the time, let’s maximize it
with the ones we love and appreciate.